The March for Science: A First-Year CMB Perspective

Written by the First-Year Class in the Cellular, Molecular and Biomedical Sciences Program at the University of Vermont   Why March? By thinking critically about the natural world, we begin to uncover the truth about how the world works and to equip ourselves with tools to better ourselves, society, and our environment. Seeking the truth … More The March for Science: A First-Year CMB Perspective

So Long and Thanks for all the Fish: an exploration of dolphin neuroanatomy and behavior

University of Vermont Neuroscience Graduate Student, Alisha Linton, writes: “So long and thanks for all the fish.” In “A Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy,” Douglas Adams depicts dolphins as the most intelligent species on Earth. So intelligent, that they are aware of the impending destruction of the Earth while humans are not. They even kindly … More So Long and Thanks for all the Fish: an exploration of dolphin neuroanatomy and behavior

Neuroethics: the border between brain research and morality

  Megan Shipman, a Ph.D. candidate in the UVM Neuroscience Graduate Program, writes: I was first introduced to the term “neuroethics” at the Society for Neuroscience meeting that I attended this past fall. In a large lecture, Dr. Joseph J. Fins, a physician and ethicist from Cornell University, presented an ethically compelling case about a … More Neuroethics: the border between brain research and morality

Where are my keys? Neurogenesis in the hippocampus and its relationship to memory and psychiatric disorders.

Jamie Abbott, a Ph.D. candidate in the UVM Cellular and Molecular Biology Program, writes: Have you ever had one of those days where you’re just not sure where you put your keys? And of course it’s the day you have three classes, a lab meeting, two assignments due, review session at 5, and soccer at … More Where are my keys? Neurogenesis in the hippocampus and its relationship to memory and psychiatric disorders.

Transitions Part Two: From Graduate School to Postdoctoral Fellow

Thanks for coming back to read Part Two of a three-part series on transitioning from graduate school to a postdoctoral fellowship and beyond. I’m Liana Merrill, faculty supervisor of the NGP blog and former UVM NGP student. Part One of this series left off with me accepting a position as a FIRST (Fellowship in Research … More Transitions Part Two: From Graduate School to Postdoctoral Fellow

Transitions Part One: Finding a Job Beyond Graduate School

I was absolutely thrilled when Stephanie Spohn and Estelle Spear asked me to be the faculty advisor for the Neuroscience Graduate Program (NGP) blog. I am a new faculty member in the Department of Neurological Sciences at the University of Vermont (UVM), but I am also an alumna of the NGP program at UVM. Blogging … More Transitions Part One: Finding a Job Beyond Graduate School

Can Neuroscience Benefit from Computer Simulations?

UVM Neuroscience Ph.D. Student, Roman Popov, writes: We, seasoned neuroscience pundits, aspiring students, and science enthusiasts, are all enthralled with the most sophisticated and intriguing organ of our bodies: the brain. Understanding its inner workings holds the potential for a multitude of advances in theoretical and applied areas of science. What is consciousness and how does the … More Can Neuroscience Benefit from Computer Simulations?

Schizophrenia and Antipsychotics: Part 3

In our final installment, Adrian Dutkiewicz discusses the current understanding of schizophrenia as well as the way drug development and pharmacology are less straight forward than one might think.  Adrian writes: Notes on the second generation drugs So how do second-generation antipsychotic medications work if they interact with D2 receptors less than first-generation neuroleptics? Research … More Schizophrenia and Antipsychotics: Part 3